How To's

Three Christmas Wreath Ideas

The Glam Christmas Wreath from Raspberry Flavoured Windows

Everyones home is an extension of their personality and when it comes to Christmas we love putting our own stamp on it. Think about the homes of your friends and family during the festive period. Each one is dressed differently with no rights and no wrongs. Different styles, different colours and yet they all have one thing in common. The love of Christmas and the enjoyment of expressing ourselves through the decoration of our homes. In this post I wanted to celebrate individuality 3 Christmas Wreath ideas each one very different. I get the feeling they will be a ‘Marmite’ thing! You’re gonna love them or hate them but hopefully there will be more love in the room than not.

As this is Christmas we’re talking about I feel I have to include a Traditional design. But for the other 2 ideas I’ve looked to current interior trends for inspiration. For my second wreath I’ve gone with a Boho feel and this wreath would suit any home with a love of dark walls, eclectic styling of colours and textures and a love of the old as well as the new. For the third wreath I was inspired by the rise of metallics, principally gold and copper coupled with jewelled coloured velvets with a sprinkling of glamour and art deco influences.

All three Christmas wreath ideas are super easy to make and cost a fraction of the amount you would have to pay if you bought them from a shop or online retailer.

 

Christmas Wreath Idea Number 1 – The Boho

 

What You Will Need

Polystyrene Wreath

Ostrich Feathers

Brown Feathers

Ribbon

Cocktail Stick

Glue Gun

Glue Sticks

 

Simple Steps to Follow

  • Gather together your Ostrich feathers in a pile and pop your glue gun on to heat up. Whilst the gun is warming sort your feathers into two piles. One of larger feathers and one for the smaller ones.
  • Starting with the outside of your wreath apply a line of glue to the bottom edge. This needs to be about the same length as your first feather minus the gorgeous head. Now press the feather into place on your wreath sideways on being careful not to glue the full end of the plumage. This will cause the feather to bend pushing the head (is that the right word?) of the feather out. Attach the next feather in exactly the same way so that the full end slightly overlaps the one of the feather before it. I find it best to work in an anti-clockwise direction but this could just be me and you may find it easier going clockwise. Continue gluing your feathers into place one by one until you have worked around the whole of the outside and join up to your first feather creating a sun effect.
  • Repeat this process on the inside edge of the wreath.
  • Tot up how many Ostrich feathers you have left and then place them (without gluing into place) randomly and evenly spaced around the top of your wreath. Follow the same direction as the inner and outer feathers. Now, using your cocktail stick make a diagonal insertion into the wreath next to the end of each quill. You can go quite deep, don’t worry.
  • Remove the feathers and one by one place a blob of glue on to the quill and insert them into the holes you have just created. Ensure that they lay parallel to the wreath but don’t actually touch it.
  • Once all your Ostrich feathers are in place it’s now time to open you smaller brown feathers and start to glue them into place, one by one. Try to randomly overlap them so that you don’t end up with any lines and lay them in the same direction as your Ostrich feathers. Keep going until the whole wreath is covered and you can no longer see any white polystyrene showing through.
  • Finally cut a piece of ribbon to the correct length required for hanging from your door. Turn the wreath over and glue the two ends of the ribbon down to create a look for hanging.

 

Believe it or not this wreath only took about an hour to make but of the three was the most expensive. It took a lot, and I mean a lot of feathers to cover it. I bought everything I needed to make it from my local Hobbycraft and  in total it took 11 packets of Ostrich Feathers (all the stock in store on the day I purchased everything) and 4 bags of plain brown feathers to cover a 35cm wreath. After totting everything up the end cost was £31.90 which I don’t think is too bad for a one off piece that will last far longer than just the festive season.

 

Christmas Wreath Idea Number 2 – The Glam

 

The Glam Christmas Wreath from Raspberry Flavoured Windows

 

What You Will Need

Polystyrene Wreath

Sticky Back Copper

Scissors

Small piece of card

Pencil

Metal Ruler

Blunt Kitchen Knife

An Old Tea Towel

Glue Gun

Glue Sticks

Micro Battery Fairy Lights

Ribbon

 

Simple Steps to Follow

  • First of all you’ll need to decide what sort of leaf you’d like to use to decorate your wreath. You could go with oak or sycamore which would both look great but for Christmas. But I think it has to be Holly or Ivy, of which I’m going with the former.
  • Once you have decided on the leaf of your choice carefully draw it on your cardboard. Make the leaf a good size, mine are around 10cm long. Too small and it will be well past Christmas and into the New Year by the time you finish it! Too large and it will be difficult to overlap the leaves. You’ll also struggle to fill in any gaps.
  • Once you are happy with your leaf (it took me several attempts at drawing one until I actually had something that vaguely resembled a leaf) cut it out to create your template.
  • On the reverse of your sticky back copper start to draw around your template. Keep going until you have around 50 leaves drawn and ready to cut out.
  • The sticky back copper I’m using has two backings. The paper backing that you draw on and a clear backing that protects the front from scratching. Once you have finished drawing all your leaves I recommend (from experience) removing the protective film. Believe me, if you don’t remove it now you will have to try and peel it off every single leaf. This is not only very fiddle but extremely time consuming too! Now you are ready to cut out all the leaves
  • Once you have all the leaves cut out it’s time to bring them to life. At this point you may be thinking that they look dreadful as did I. For some unknown reason this wreath doesn’t actually look good until it’s completed. This is where the tea towel comes into play, without it the wreath would remain flat and uninteresting. Fold the tea towel in half twice to make a pad. Then place your first leaf on top of it. Line up your ruler from the point at one end to the point at the other. Then carefully using your blunt knife score along the edge of your ruler from the bottom of the leaf to the top using steady and reasonably hard pressure. Using the tea towel under the leaf allows the pressure of the knife not only to score the leaf but to bend it too giving a more 3D appearance.
  • Using the knife again, work from the central line on the leaf out to the tips of the leaf to create veins.
  • When you have completed all the leaves you are almost ready to start putting your wreath together. First though we need to prepare it for your micro battery operated fairy lights. Turn your wreath over and draw around the battery box on the reverse of the wreath. Then using your kitchen knife dig out the polystyrene to create a hole large enough to hold the battery case. Now pop your lights to one side for the moment and flip the wreath back over ready to decorate.
  • Once again I worked in an anti clockwise direction and I started with the centre of the wreath first as these leaves are the trickiest to position. Take your first leaf and remove the backing paper, add a blob of glue to the base of the leaf and stick it down so that the tip of the leaf is slightly overlapping the inner edge of your wreath. Repeat with the next leaf and the next overlapping the previous leaf as you go until you have completed the full circle.
  • Repeat this process on the outside edge making sure that your leaves are pointing in the same direction as the inner leaves.
  • Now add a second layer of leaves to the outer edge slightly above the first layer with the tip of each leaf level with the middle of each leaf of the first layer.
  • Repeat this process to create a layer of leaves above the inner layer you completed a moment ago.
  • To complete, fill in the space that‘s left around the highest point of the wreath. I found I had enough room for 3 more layers.
  • Now for the fairy lights which I like to think represent the berries of my Holly. Flip over your wreath and after applying a good dollop of glue to the back of your battery case place it in the hole you made earlier and hold in place for a few seconds whilst the glue cools down before turning it back, right side up. Carefully bring your wire to the front of the wreath and wind it back and forth around the whole wreath though your leaves tucking the wires away neatly. You will find the sticky backing is very useful in holding the wire out of site.
  • To complete the wreath cut your ribbon to the desired length for hanging and attach to the reverse centre top with a good blob of glue.

This wreath was actually the cheapest of all three to make as I already had the sticky back copper left over from a previous project. Basically it cost me £3.50 for the wreath but this was also the one that was the most labour intensive and took in the end around 4 hours to make. I think it was worth it though.

 

Wreath Number 3 – The Traditional

 

The Traditional Christmas Wreath From Raspberry Flavoured Windows

 

What You Will Need

Polystyrene Wreath

Twine

Foliage

Scissors

Decorations of your choice

Ribbon

Glue Gun

Glue Sticks

 

Simple Instructions to Follow

  • Cut you twine to the requited length for hanging and tie it around your wreath.
  • Pop your glue gun on to heat up. Then have a play around with your foliage to get an idea of where you would like to put each piece. Rather than go for leaves in all in one direction as I have with the other 2 wreaths I decided that I would separate this wreath into two halves. Starting with the centre top I added my foliage down both sides to overlap at the centre bottom. Adding the leaves is super easy just keep gluing more foliage onto the wreath overlapping each piece with the one before it until the whole wreath is covered and you can no longer see any of the white polystyrene showing through. Just remember to keep your hanging twine in the right place. Or you could end up with a very lopsided wreath when you finally hang it up.
  • I then added some laurel leaves to the top to create a focal point before gluing in place three fake Poinsettia flowers (a great Christmas tradition).
  • It’s now just a case of gluing in place all your other chosen decorations. I went for a selection of small gold baubles and tiny glittery gold pine cones. I did also add a Robin perched nonchalantly on the inner base of my wreath just because I love Robins!
  • The final step is to add your ribbon. I used a whole reel and started by making a bow smack bang in the middle of it. I glued it into place just below the poinsettias and then wound it back and forth around my wreath. Finally I secured the ends with a blob of glue on the reverse of the wreath.

This wreath was by far the quickest to make taking just a little more than half an hour from start to finish. Costing just under £20 it’s a fraction of the cost you would expect to pay on the high street.

So, what do you think? Which one is your favourite and are you going to give any of them a go? I’d love to hear your thoughts so please leave me a comment below. Even better. If you do decide to make one of my three Christmas wreath ideas please share a picture of it with me. Maybe tag me on Instagram too, it’d make my day. Oh, and if you still have time on your hands how about trying my DIY Pheasant Feather Christmas Place Cards too. x

 

Rachel's Signature

 

 

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